Grafik zur Vortragsreihe Wissenschaft mit Wirkung

© BAM

In the lecture series "Science with Impact" we want to specifically address the question of how research can have an impact and benefit society in post-factual times. Throughout the year, speakers from BAM and from our worldwide network will highlight current issues in our five thematic areas of energy, infrastructure, environment, materials and analytical sciences.

The series started with a digital symposium on "Trust in Future Technologies" in March.

You can find the previous lectures here.

Current dates of the lecture series "Science with Impact":

22.10.2021 - Prof. Nancy R. Sottos, UIUC, Illinois, USA

DateFriday, 22 October 2021, 03:00 pm
Type of EventWebinar
TopicControl of Reaction Fronts for Rapid Energy -
Efficient Manufacturing of Multifunctional Polymers and Composites
Presenter

Prof. Nancy R. Sottos

UIUC, Illinois, USA

SummaryThis lecture describes a new manufacturing platform technology that allows for near net-zero energy fabrication of structural polymers and composites. The approach is predicated on the exploitation of a self-propagating polymerization reaction occurring in a system undergoing reaction and diffusion of its components. The system uses the exothermic release of energy to provide a positive feedback to the reaction. In turn, this stimulates further exothermic energy release, and a self-propagating reaction front that rapidly moves through the material – a process called frontal polymerization. The frontal ring opening metathesis polymerization of endo-dicyclopentadiene using a thermally activated ruthenium catalyst exhibits the high energy density, high reactivity, and low viscosity required for the synthesis of high-performance thermosets. The resulting polydicyclopentadiene is a cross-linked thermoset polymer suitable for the fabrication of durable resin and fiber-reinforced composites. Composite parts are fabricated in less than 5 min by frontal ring opening metathesis polymerization of woven carbon fibers infused with monomer solution. The total energy to create a 30x30 cm panel is 50 J compared to approximately 500 MJ by conventional autoclave curing – a seven order of magnitude decrease in required energy. Tuning the resin chemistry allows access to a range of rheological profiles between low-viscosity liquid and free-standing elastomeric gel – all of which frontally polymerize upon thermal activation. The gel is amenable to 3D printing by extruding from a print head and frontally polymerizing immediately upon exiting the nozzle, thereby allowing for the simultaneous freeform printing and curing of thermoset polymers. Frontal polymerization enables the manufacture of complex architectures, in situ fabrication of vascular networks and the seamless addition of functional additives not possible with traditional processing approaches.
LanguageEnglish
Link-RegistrationWebex
BAM Contact Prof. Dr. Robert Maaß, robert.maass[at]bam.de

25.10.2021 - Prof. Dr. Petra S. Dittrich, ETH Zurich, Switzerland

DateMonday, 25 October 2021, 03:00 pm
Type of EventWebinar
TopicDrop by drop: Multiplexed and multimodal analysis of cells and chemical reactions at high throughput
PresenterProf. Dr. Petra S. Dittrich
Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering
ETH Zurich, Switzerland
SummaryDroplet microfluidics is a particularly powerful method for screening applications e.g. for protein engineering and single-cell studies. Monodisperse aqueous droplets of pico- or nanoliter volume immersed in a hydrophobic fluid are formed in a microfluidic device at kHz frequencies. In recent years, droplet microfluidics has been employed for analysis of bioanalytical assays and chemical synthesis, such as kinetic studies of enzymes, cell-free protein synthesis, protein crystallization, nanoparticle formation and many more. In the field of single-cell analysis including single-cell sequencing, droplet microfluidics is nowadays a well-approved method and alternative to cytometry. In the first part of the presentation, I will show applications of droplet microfluidics, where the compartmentalization is of high importance, e.g., when secreted compounds of cells are analyzed.
Most assays in nL droplets, however, are based on fluorescence spectroscopy, which limits the choice of assays and multiplexing capability. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, allows for label-free detection and identification of multiple components. Recently, we have interfaced droplet microfluidics with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-MS. Instead of the standard MALDI targets where the sample is pipetted in 384 wells, we have fabricated custom-made, transparent, indium-tin oxide coated targets, on which thousands of aqueous nL-droplets reside on the surface, covered by fluorinated oil. Analysis of this droplet array is performed by optical and fluorescence microscopy as well as by means of a MALDI-MS imaging system (Bruker rapifleX). We employ the method for single-cell studies at high throughput, e.g. analysis of biosynthesized enzymes, which will be discussed in the second part of the presentation. First steps towards extremely high throughput measurements will be introduced with our recently fabricated plates hosting up to 300 000 droplets, which poses additional challenges for automated data acquisition and analysis.
LanguageEnglish
Link-RegistrationWebex
BAM Contact Dr. Ute Resch-Genger, ute.resch[at]bam.de

26.10.2021 - Prof. Dr. Gary M. Hieftje, Indiana University

DateTuesday, 26 October 2021, 03:00 pm
Type of EventWebinar
TopicSources, Spectrometers, and Systems for Elemental, Molecular, and Biomolecular Analysis
PresenterProf. Dr. Gary M. Hieftje
Department of Chemistry, Indiana University
Summary

In the 150 years during which BAM and its predecessors have been in existence, the field of spectrochemistry has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a workhorse employed to measure almost anything in everything. In the area of elemental analysis alone, atomization/excitation sources have evolved from moderate-temperature chemical flames to high-temperature electrical discharges powered by dc, low-frequency, radiofrequency, and microwave supplies. Similarly, primary light sources used for absorption and fluorescence have progressed from those of natural origin (e.g. the sun) to devices powered by supplies ranging from electrical to nuclear. During the same period, spectrometers moved from optical systems operated manually and employing detection by the human eye to sophisticated simultaneous multichannel arrangements operated under computer control and guided by artificial intelligence. It is therefore natural to question whether this trend can continue. Is spectrochemistry approaching a plateau? Can new, ever better sources and spectrometers be conceived and developed? Even more important, can newly developed instruments address all problems likely to be critical in coming years?

In this presentation, these questions will be placed in the context of past and recent developments in instrumentation and methods for elemental, molecular, and biomolecular analysis. It will be argued that progress in instrumentation science and, indeed, science in general is evolutionary rather than revolutionary; true breakthroughs are impossible to presage. As a result, near-future advances can be gauged in part by reviewing recent, promising innovations. Several of these innovations will be described and critiqued, with emphasis being placed on multidimensional, information-rich sources, spectrometers, and detectors.

LanguageEnglish
Link-RegistrationWebex
BAM Contact Dr. Björn Meermann, bjoern.meermann[at]bam.de

28.10.2021 - Prof. Dr. Lisa Gieg, University of Calgary, Canada

DateThursday, 28 October 2021, 04:00 pm
Type of EventWebinar
TopicMicrobes in man-made systems
PresenterProf. Dr. Lisa Gieg
Lead of geno-MIC “Managing Microbial Corrosion in Canadian Offshore and Onshore Oil Production” project
Professor (Associate), Department of Biological Sciences at University of Calgary, Canada
Summarys in the natural world, microorganisms inhabit almost all man-made systems. Man-made systems, also called the ‘built environment’, include much of the important infrastructure needed for humans to live comfortably: water treatment and delivery systems, wastewater treatment systems, as well as energy production, processing and transport systems. Microorganisms that are integral to these types of man-made systems often play beneficial roles, wherein their metabolisms are crucial for achieving a positive outcome (such as effective wastewater treatment). In contrast, microorganisms and their metabolisms can also play detrimental roles that threaten critical infrastructure which in turn can threaten the natural environment (such as petroleum pipeline failures). This presentation will highlight examples of beneficial and detrimental metabolic processes carried out by microorganisms that inhabit and influence the built environment. Better characterizing and understanding the microorganisms that thrive in man-made systems can help to improve beneficial processes, minimize harmful processes, and to better assess these systems for their impact on the natural world.
LanguageEnglish
Link-RegistrationWebex
BAM Contact Prof. Dr. Anna A. Gorbushina, anna.gorbushina[at]bam.de

This lecture ist part of the LECTURE SERIES Microbes and Environmental Chemistry 14.10. - 18.11.2021. Join us for a virtual trip around the world: on six Thursdays from 14 October to 18 November, always from 4 to 6pm. Six renowned international scientists will share their ground-breaking observations of processes on this planet. The spotlight is on interactions of living organisms and landscapes /materials as mediators of global change in all regions of the Earth.

Moderation: Prof. Dr. Anna A. Gorbushina, BAM & FU Departments of Biology, Chemistry and Pharmacy & Geosciences; Prof. Dr. Matthias Rillig, FU Department of Biology, Chemistry and Pharmacy; Prof. Dr. Esther Schwarzenbach, FU Department of Geosciences

29.10.2021 - Johan, Vyncke, Director Research & Innovation at WTCB-BBRI

Read the Interview with RILEM out-going President (2018-2021), Johan Vyncke

Invitation
DateFriday, 29 October 2021, 10:00 am
Type of EventWebinar
TopicDigitalisation and Circularity in the Construction sector, two key elements which go hand in hand and are essential to assure our sustainable future
PresenterJohan, Vyncke
Director Research & Innovation at WTCB-BBRI
Summarycoming soon
LanguageEnglish
Link-RegistrationWebex
BAM Contact Dr.-Ing. Andreas Rogge, andreas.rogge[at]bam.de

01.11.2021 - Prof. Dr. Christoph Sommitsch, Institutsvorstand Technische Universität Graz, Institut für Werkstoffkunde, Fügetechnik und Umformtechnik

Invitation
DateMonday, 1 November 2021, 10:00 am
Type of EventWebinar
TopicTrends in der metalladditiven Fertigung
PresenterProf. Dr. Christoph Sommitsch
Technische Universität Graz
SummaryHeutige und zukünftige Produkte mit sehr speziellen Eigenschaften erfordern Hochleistungswerkstoffe und maßgeschneiderte Fertigungsmethoden. Im Vortrag wird anhand unterschiedlicher Materialien gezeigt, wie Prozesse in der Fügetechnik, Umformtechnik und metalladditiven Fertigung eingesetzt werden, um die geforderten Anforderungen zu erfüllen. Einflussfaktoren sind u.a. komplexe Geometrien, Funktionsintegration, hocheffiziente und ressourcenschonende Fertigung, gradierte Gefügestrukturen und Materialeigenschaften und hybride Werkstoffsysteme.
LanguageGerman
Link-Registrationcoming soon
BAM Contact Dr.-Ing. Thomas Kannengießer, Thomas.Kannengiesser[at]bam.de

04.11.2021 - Prof. Dr. Friedhelm von Blanckenburg, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences / Freie Universität Berlin

DateThursday, 4 November 2021, 04:00 pm
Type of EventWebinar
TopicDoes life drive rock weathering?
PresenterProf. Dr. Friedhelm von Blanckenburg
Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences – Head of Section “Earth Surface Geochemistry”
Professor of the Geochemistry of the Earth Surface, Freie Universität Berlin
SummaryPlants and the microbes that interact with their roots have developed a fantastic trading system. Microbes, mainly bacteria and specialized fungi directly or indirectly decompose minerals in rock and soil and to pass the obtained mineral nutrients, like phosphorus, to the roots of plants that thus satisfy their nutrient demand. In return, plants pass energy in the form of hydrocarbons to the below-ground microbiota. Using estimates of the resulting mineral decomposition rates a massive acceleration of mineral dissolution, called “weathering”, would be expected beneath higher plants. As geochemists we have developed the ability to test whether this is indeed the case in natural field conditions by isotope-based measurements of the chemical mass fluxes involved. Surprisingly, we find no acceleration of weathering along geographic gradients of increasing plant growth. Rather, we find that a sophisticated circular economy is in place: the lower nutrient availability in soil, and the higher the demand of a plant-essential element, the more are these elements recycled. It is fascinating to see how entire plant-microbial systems adapt to their environment. But rock weathering is mainly driven by geologic (relief) and climatic (runoff) forces.
LanguageEnglish
Link-RegistrationWebex
BAM Contact Prof. Dr. Anna A. Gorbushina, anna.gorbushina[at]bam.de

This lecture ist part of the LECTURE SERIES Microbes and Environmental Chemistry 14.10. - 18.11.2021. Join us for a virtual trip around the world: on six Thursdays from 14 October to 18 November, always from 4 to 6pm. Six renowned international scientists will share their ground-breaking observations of processes on this planet. The spotlight is on interactions of living organisms and landscapes /materials as mediators of global change in all regions of the Earth.

Moderation: Prof. Dr. Anna A. Gorbushina, BAM & FU Departments of Biology, Chemistry and Pharmacy & Geosciences; Prof. Dr. Matthias Rillig, FU Department of Biology, Chemistry and Pharmacy; Prof. Dr. Esther Schwarzenbach, FU Department of Geosciences

10.11.2021 - Franz Piker, Österreichisches Kompetenzzentrum für Tribologie (AC²T)

Date10. November 2021, 11:00 Uhr
Type of EventWebinar
TopicTribologie mit Wirkung – Wie Digitalisierung Tribologie für die Industrie nutzbar macht
PresenterFranz Pirker
Österreichisches Kompetenzzentrum für Tribologie (AC²T)
SummaryWo immer sich bewegende Körper im Kontakt befinden, bestimmen die entsprechenden Materialien die Reibungs- und Verschleißeigenschaften der jeweiligen Komponenten und Produkte. Um solche Materialien, einschließlich Schmierstoffe und Oberflächengestaltungen zu finden, die die an die jeweiligen Produkte gestellten Anforderungen an Effizienz und Haltbarkeit erfüllen, sind lange Entwicklungsprozesse und hohe Kosten für Prototypen keine Seltenheit. Um Zeit und Kosten für die marktreife Entwicklung von Produkten zu verringern, wurden (im H2020-Projekt i-TRIBOMAT) tribologische (Reibung, Verschleiß, Schmierung) Modelltests standardisiert, um hinreichende Mengen von Daten hoher Qualität zu erzeugen, die die Anwendung intelligenter Datendienste und Simulationen in virtuellen Arbeitsräumen ermöglichen und das Hochskalieren der so erzielten Ergebnisse von der Labor- auf die Produktebene erlauben.
LanguageGerman
Link-RegistrationWebex
BAM ContactDirk Spaltmann, dirk.spaltmann[at]bam.de

11.11.2021 - Prof. Dr. Antje Boetius, Helmholtz-Centre for Polar and Marine Research / University Bremen / Max Planck Institute for Marine-Microbiology

DateThursday, 4 November 2021, 04:00 pm
Type of EventWebinar
TopicGlobal change microbiology — big questions about small life for our future
PresenterProf. Dr. Antje Boetius
Director Alfred-Wegener-Institute, Helmholtz-Centre for Polar and Marine Research
Deputy director MARUM Centre for Marine Environmental Science (MARUM) University Bremen
Professor Max Planck Institute for Marine-Microbiology
SummaryMicrobial communities play a key role in the evolution and dynamics of the entire Earth system. But we seem to lag behind other research communities when it comes to producing regionally and globally integrated information of pressing scientific and societal relevance, such as loss of species and habitats, and feedback mechanisms to anthropogenic impacts. Methods are needed that enable us to quantify large-scale patterns, rates, and feedback mechanisms associated with microbially-mediated ecosystem services, addressing questions such as: How is ocean productivity changing? How does warming affect microbial feedback in the carbon and nitrogen budget? Has the exponential increase in anthropogenic pollution, such as plastic waste, altered the global microbiome? This presentation discusses examples of such impact studies, and what is needed to upscale them in an integrated approach, to define large-scale mechanisms, and the “good” or “bad” environmental status. A key question is how we can include our knowledge on microbial community dynamics into system solutions for a sustainable future.
LanguageEnglish
Link-RegistrationWebex
BAM Contact Prof. Dr. Anna A. Gorbushina, anna.gorbushina[at]bam.de

This lecture ist part of the LECTURE SERIES Microbes and Environmental Chemistry 14.10. - 18.11.2021. Join us for a virtual trip around the world: on six Thursdays from 14 October to 18 November, always from 4 to 6pm. Six renowned international scientists will share their ground-breaking observations of processes on this planet. The spotlight is on interactions of living organisms and landscapes /materials as mediators of global change in all regions of the Earth.

Moderation: Prof. Dr. Anna A. Gorbushina, BAM & FU Departments of Biology, Chemistry and Pharmacy & Geosciences; Prof. Dr. Matthias Rillig, FU Department of Biology, Chemistry and Pharmacy; Prof. Dr. Esther Schwarzenbach, FU Department of Geosciences

18.11.2021 - Prof. Dr. Dirk Wagner, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences / University of Potsdam

DateThursday, 4 November 2021, 04:00 pm
Type of EventWebinar
TopicOf survival artists and superheroes — microbial life in terrestrial extreme habitats
PresenterProf. Dr. Dirk Wagner
Director Department Geochemistry, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences
Head of Section “Geomicrobiology”
Professor for Geomicrobiology and Geobiology at University of Potsdam
SummaryMost habitats on Earth are characterized by extreme environmental conditions. All these environments are at the edge of habitability and range from equatorial to polar regions, from marine to terrestrial environments and from surface to deep subsurface ecosystems. Environmental niches in extreme environments are in general characterized by extraordinarily hot, cold, acidic, alkaline or dry conditions, or are subjected to high salinity, radiation or pressure. Desert soils, for example, are characterized by extreme heat during the day and very low temperatures at night. In addition, there is a lack of water and nutrients, as well as high salt content and high UV radiation. In this lecture multiple examples will be given illustrating that a large number of different microorganisms can be found in such habitats, despite the extreme conditions. These microorganisms – called extremophiles - have adapted perfectly and are therefore able to colonize virtually any niche on Earth - no matter how hostile it may appear – as long as it is not too hot. Geomicrobiologists want to understand the structure and function of microbial communities in extreme environments, their life strategies and adaptation mechanisms as well as their reaction to changing environmental conditions. Finally, extremophiles are also useful model organisms to learn more about potential life beyond Earth.
LanguageEnglish
Link-RegistrationWebex
BAM Contact Prof. Dr. Anna A. Gorbushina, anna.gorbushina[at]bam.de

This lecture ist part of the LECTURE SERIES Microbes and Environmental Chemistry 14.10. - 18.11.2021. Join us for a virtual trip around the world: on six Thursdays from 14 October to 18 November, always from 4 to 6pm. Six renowned international scientists will share their ground-breaking observations of processes on this planet. The spotlight is on interactions of living organisms and landscapes /materials as mediators of global change in all regions of the Earth.

Moderation: Prof. Dr. Anna A. Gorbushina, BAM & FU Departments of Biology, Chemistry and Pharmacy & Geosciences; Prof. Dr. Matthias Rillig, FU Department of Biology, Chemistry and Pharmacy; Prof. Dr. Esther Schwarzenbach, FU Department of Geosciences

23.11.2021 - Prof. Dr. Peter Mayr, Technical University of Munich

Invitation
DateTuesday, 23 November 2021, 02:00 pm
Type of EventWebinar
TopicMetallurgical aspects in arc-based additive manufacturing
Presenter

Prof. Dr. Peter Mayr

Chair of Materials Engineering of Additive Manufacturing, Mechanical Engineering Department, Technical University of Munich

SummaryFor the manufacturing of large engineering components, arc-based direct-energy-deposition additive manufacturing is a promising technology.
With its origin in welding engineering, DED is capable of producing large volumes in reasonable time by still maintaining the advantages of additive manufacturing.
Within this contribution, the fabrication of multi-material parts and the observation of metallurgical phenomena will be discussed.
LanguageEnglish
Link-RegistrationWebex
BAM Contact Prof. Dr.-Ing. Thomas Böllinghaus, Thomas.Boellinghaus[at]bam.de